Doing Construction on/across/above/below RTD Facilities?

RTD has specific required procedures you must follow, forms you must fill out and submit, safety training you must complete, agreements and permits you must acquire before entering or doing any work on/across RTD Facilities (including RTD property or Right-of-Way [ROW], buildings and grounds, Park-n-Rides [PnR], bus routes and stops, and rail corridors and stations).

What Does Your Work Involve?

Step-by-Step Guide: Please Read All Sections below as Several Scenarios Apply to Most Projects

  1. You MUST start your application process by submitting a preliminary design to RTD Engineering for review.
     
  2. After RTD Engineering gives you the green light, you will start the official process by submitting an Agreement Request package to RTD Real Property Department. RTD Real Property will review your request package then route it to the appropriate RTD departments for review. This review process can take time and be delayed if the application package is missing information or if the design violates RTD criteria. 
    RTD Right-of-Way Access Permits, Right of Way section
     
  3. After your design has been approved by all departments and only after RTD Real Property has executed an Approved Agreement for your project, you will need to apply for a permit to do work across RTD Tracks. RTD railroad corridors are owned/maintained by two different groups (Light Rail LRT and Commuter Rail CRT). Each group has its own unique procedure, application form, required training, and meetings. The location of your work will determine to which group you need to apply. 
    Rail Map
  4. Every worker on the job will need to take and successfully complete all appropriate railroad safety training classes. 
    Railroad Safety Training
     
  5. Next, you will need to attend the corresponding light/commuter rail operations meeting. The details of your work are discussed, including worker safety and the need for flaggers, at these meetings. You will need to prove completion of applicable railroad safety training prior to or at these meetings. Only after receiving an approved permit may you begin work in accordance with that permit and the terms of the RTD Agreement. 

    RTD Right-of-Way Access Permits, LRT Permit Request Section
    RTD Right-of-Way Access Permits, CRT Permit Request Section

  1. You MUST start your application process by submitting a preliminary design to RTD Engineering for review.
  2. After RTD Engineering gives you the green light, you will start the official process by submitting an Agreement Request package to the RTD Real Property Department. RTD Real Property will review your request package then route it to the appropriate RTD departments for review. This review process can take time and be delayed if the application package is missing information or if the design violates RTD criteria. 
    RTD Right-of-Way Access Permits, Right of Way section
  3. After your design has been approved by all departments and only after RTD Real Property has executed an Approved Agreement for your project, you will need to apply for a Building Grounds Access Permit (BGAP) to do work on RTD ROW through the RTD Facilities group. 
    RTD Right-of-Way Access Permits, Facilities section

RTD requires railroad safety training for any work near RTD tracks. RTD’s visual corridors are just as important as RTD’s physical corridors for safe rail transit, so work near RTD tracks may impact RTD rail operations. When working near RTD tracks, consider reach and swing of construction equipment (i.e., overhead, at-grade, and underground). RTD also maintains critical facilities key to safe operation of RTD’s rail corridors including traction power substations, overhead catenary systems, signal systems, track, and track ROWs such as rail beds and structures. These facilities, if damaged, can be dangerous to RTD train operations and contractors if contacted by workers or equipment. Be aware, some RTD buried facilities are not contained between tracks or within fenced substation areas but occasionally run down and across local streets. RTD is expanding and our systems are everywhere. 
Railroad Safety Training

Your work may indirectly impact RTD property, ROW, or facilities. RTD reviews plans submitted to RTD from local jurisdictions to ensure adjacent construction projects will not adversely impact RTD property, ROW, or facilities. If your work may impact RTD, coordinate with the local Jurisdictions to submit your plans to RTD. 
Engineering Design and Review

RTD Rail Operations and RTD Maintenance of Way run a mandatory meeting to discuss impacts of your work on train operations, allocate flagger resources for work within 10 feet of RTD’s LRT, and issue permits allowing you to perform your work. RTDC-DTO Rail Operations is responsible for the same functions on all CRT rail rights of way. RTD requires flaggers to be present during all work within 10 feet of operating rail corridors, including all pre-work (e.g., surveys, potholes, or mobilization of equipment). If more than one railroad is located in the vicinity of your work, you will need to arrange in advance for separate approved flaggers specific to each railroad. BNSF/UPRR approved flaggers do not fulfill RTD’s flagging requirements. 
RTD Right-of-Way Access Permits, LRT Permit Request Section
RTD Right-of-Way Access Permits, CRT Permit Request Section

Contractors need to coordinate all work along bus routes and/or near bus facilities with RTD Bus Operations. RTD Bus/Street Operations coordinates and prepares updates of bus routes and detours affected by disruption of services due to construction, special events, and emergencies. RTD works closely with law enforcement, jurisdictions, public works departments, and municipalities to review construction design, traffic control plans, lane closures, and detours to minimize impacts to bus operations. 
RTD Right-of-Way Access Permits, Bus Operations section

RTD Engineering is responsible for the design and maintenance of all RTD’s drainage facilities. This function includes drainage ditches, detention ponds, culverts, drainage structures, underground pipes, and control of surface run-off across RTD’s tracks, ROW, Park-n-Rides, bus stops, and other facilities. 
Engineering and Design Review

RTD Engineering and RTD Systems are responsible for the location and design of RTD-owned utilities. Included in this function are traction power substations, overhead catenary systems, underground electric and communication ducts, signal systems, track underdrains, utility corridors, water, sanitary sewer, and storm drain pipes. Installation of utilities adjacent to, on, or across RTD ROW/facilities is a safety concern and requires an additional specific procedure before access permits for work can be obtained. 
Utility Construction

Before You Dig

Contact appropriate RTD departments and include the following specific information to define your work in every email or phone message before you address the body of your questions or requests:

  • Company name (who the work is being done for)
  • Location of your work (nearest major streets)
  • RTD rail corridor or bus route nearest to your work
  • Type of work (what are you installing, removing)
  • Contact name, phone, and email

When emailing, please use detailed and specific subject headers. When leaving phone messages, please speak slowly and clearly especially if you are on a cellphone as your messages may not be delivered clearly to RTD. RTD receives many requests for work each day so the details you provide us up front will help our staff locate your request quickly.

Quick Email Links:

Plan Ahead – The RTD review process can take several months to complete and approval is NOT GUARANTEED.

Construction in the District

In addition to RTD requirements for construction, work in the Regional Transportation District involves many jurisdictions with their own design, engineering, and construction sites. It is your responsibility to determine which jurisdiction construction and engineering requirements you need to meet.

Construction on Other Railroads

RTD Construction Projects

RTD is involved in many of its construction projects throughout the region. Below is a list of some of RTD’s larger construction projects. If you have upcoming projects planned for areas that overlap with RTD’s projects, plan ahead and coordinate your work with RTD projects.